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Amy Reddish Criminology Alumni Case Study Video

Amy graduated from the University of Lincoln in 2006 with a Criminology degree and now works as a Supervisory Officer at HMS Morton mentoring new officers.

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Dr Meredith Nash to give lecture on what it’s like to be a woman in STEMM

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We are really pleased to announce that the Eleanor Glanville Centre’s first International Visiting Scholar, Dr Meredith Nash will be giving a Be Inspired! Lecture:

‘What is it like to be a woman in STEMM? Gender bias, sexual harassment, and the myth of meritocracy’

Meredith Nash is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Deputy Director of the Institute for the Study of Social Change at the University of Tasmania. She is at the University of Lincoln as a Visiting Scholar at the Eleanor Glanville Centre and the Health Advancement Research Team. Her research examines the depth and enduring character of gender-based inequalities.

Abstract: Women are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) fields worldwide, particularly in leadership positions. In this presentation, Dr Nash will discuss her findings from a mixed-methods sociological study drawing on the experiences of 25 women in STEMM fields who were all participants in a three-week transformational leadership program in Antarctica in 2016. She will explore the women’s experiences of science leadership, including challenges they face as women in male-dominated fields and what they think needs to change to help women in STEMM advance.​

Monday 23rd October

17:00 pm lecture, followed by a wine reception

Co-Op Lecture Theatre Minerva Building

Meredith’s key publications include Making Postmodern Mothers: Pregnant Embodiment, Baby Bumps, and Body Image (2012, Palgrave); Reframing Reproduction: Conceiving Gendered Experiences (2014, Palgrave) and Reading Lena Dunham’s Girls: Feminism, Postfeminism, Authenticity and Gendered Performance in Contemporary Television (2017, Palgrave).

 This lecture is free to attend but prior booking is essential

To get your tickets click here

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Educational Research PhD Student Video

Theresa Marriott is an Educational Research PhD student here at the University of Lincoln and she is currently writing up her final thesis, which focuses on the perceptions and identities of FE teachers. Theresa also delivers PGCE classes to teacher training students. A big thank you to Theresa for taking time out of her busy schedule to record this snapshot video for us and we wish her every success in her career.

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Lincoln Law Professor, Matthew Hall on the Sentencing of Oxford University Student, Lavinia Woodward

Macmillan Cake Sale

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Staff from the College of Social Science have managed to raise £74.26 for Macmillan Cancer Care from the cake sale held in Bridge House on Wednesday 27th September. There was a variety of delights including sponge cake, scones and cheese straws. A huge thank you to everyone who baked, bought and contributed to this fantastic cause.

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If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

New Study Shows That People Who Attend Concerts Are More Likely To Give To Charity

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A new study conducted by the University of Lincoln and the University of Kent indicates that those who attend cultural events, including concerts are more likely to participate in charity campaigns through either donating or volunteering, regardless of social background and income.

Dr. Julie Van de Vyver, the author of the study, stated that the statistical strength of their findings surprised them. She added that the role of the arts and its influence in society was significant enough to develop prosocial behavior.

She also added that if the arts has the power to influence and promote prosocial behaviour in people, its contribution to society should be recognised.

According to Dr. Van de Vyver, one of the probable causes of this prosocial behaviour is the shared meaning created by art among people involved in artistic events and activities. This shared meaning is able then to develop into compassion and empathy for others.

According to the co-author of the research Professor Dominic Abrams from the University of Kent, this shared meaning and experience is easy to accomplish because anyone can engage in artistic activities, regardless of where they are in the world, either directly or by observing the works of others.

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Lincoln Sport & Exercise Science Student Becomes Powerlifting Medallist!

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Congratulations to Alex Jackson who took third place in a very competitive 72-kg class at the recent British University Powerlifting Championships. Alex achieved personal bests in all three lifts (Squat, Bench and Deadlift) including a British junior record of 178 kg in the Deadlift!

Alex, who is in her first year of the BSc (Hons) Strength & Conditioning in Sport programme, is also a Sports Scholar at the University and is coached by Senior Lecturer Tom Gee:
“My experience at the British University Championships was a positive one: I was able to compete against athletes of varying abilities and ages and did so successfully with the help of Tom Gee. To be able to compete through the University with a high-level coach at my side enabled me to produce a competitive performance that placed me third overall.”

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Lincoln Professor talking Sustainable Development in South Africa

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Professor Duncan French, Head of Lincoln Law School and Professor of International Law, has recently attended the third meeting of the Rule of Law and Sustainable Development seminar organised by the Regional African Law and Human Security Programme (RALHUS).

Professor French presented a paper on contemporary case-law on sustainable development, including both international jurisprudence and domestic decisions. He reflected on the significant developments in the case-law, in the field of domestic courts holding States to account on the issue of climate change and, internationally, in developments on the legal principle of due diligence.

Nevertheless, Professor French cautioned against a wholesale endorsement of recent case-law, noting the recent decision of the International Court in the joined cases of Costa Rica v Nicaragua / Nicaragua v Costa Rica (2015) and creeping legal formalism. Thus he left the workshop with a question; are we seeing a maturity in the environmental jurisprudence or is there risk of sterility in the guise of meeting specified procedural steps?

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Couples on the rocks find happiness by ‘sticking it out’

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Report findings show that over two thirds of parents who were unhappy following the arrival of their first born were content together 10 years on, going against the notion that people put up with unhappy relationships for the sake of their offspring.

Harry Benson of the Marriage Foundation and Steve McKay of the University of Lincoln looked at data from 10,000 parents who participated in the Millennium Cohort Study, and focused on parents who reported being unhappy not long after the birth of their first child during the period around the year 2000. The couples were asked about how they feel again 11 years later, with seven out of 10 still together and only one in 10 of the couples who were still together continuing to feel sadness. Furthermore, over a quarter of the parents who previously felt their relationship was in trouble at the beginning but stayed together later described themselves as “extremely happy”.

From the results, Benson and McKay noted that those pairs who cohabited and were on the brink of splitting up were over twice as likely as married couples to actually break-up. However, they stressed the rewards to come if parents stayed together through the difficult times.

“Contrary to popular belief, staying in an unhappy marriage could be the best thing you ever do,” Benson explained. “Most marriages have their unhappy moments, but apart from the fortunately extremely rare cases where the relationship involves abuse, most couples can work through the difficulties to be happy later on.”

Backing these findings was Marriage Foundation head Sir Paul Coleridge, who describes the results as “myth-busting” as it proves a couple going through a rocky time as they adjust to parenthood doesn’t necessarily mean they won’t make it through to the other end.

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Check out the college’s Facebook page!

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The College of Social Science now has a Facebook page! Please follow us to keep up to date with all of the college news and events.

You can also find us on Twitter and Instagram.

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk