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University of Lincoln to Host Events at the ESRC Festival of Social Science

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The University of Lincoln is pleased to be taking part in the Economic and Social Research Council’s Festival of Social Science, which is happening across the UK from the 4th to the 11th of November. Events will include, ‘Imagining a Child-Friendly Lincoln’, which will offer a range of free interactive activities for children and families, and ‘Supporting Victims of Crime in Lincolnshire and Beyond’, a one day conference and public seminar, which will include contributions from the Police and Crime Commissioner, Lincolnshire Police, and the local victims’ support hub, ‘Victim Lincs’.

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If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Dr Meredith Nash to give lecture on what it’s like to be a woman in STEMM

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We are really pleased to announce that the Eleanor Glanville Centre’s first International Visiting Scholar, Dr Meredith Nash will be giving a Be Inspired! Lecture:

‘What is it like to be a woman in STEMM? Gender bias, sexual harassment, and the myth of meritocracy’

Meredith Nash is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Deputy Director of the Institute for the Study of Social Change at the University of Tasmania. She is at the University of Lincoln as a Visiting Scholar at the Eleanor Glanville Centre and the Health Advancement Research Team. Her research examines the depth and enduring character of gender-based inequalities.

Abstract: Women are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) fields worldwide, particularly in leadership positions. In this presentation, Dr Nash will discuss her findings from a mixed-methods sociological study drawing on the experiences of 25 women in STEMM fields who were all participants in a three-week transformational leadership program in Antarctica in 2016. She will explore the women’s experiences of science leadership, including challenges they face as women in male-dominated fields and what they think needs to change to help women in STEMM advance.​

Monday 23rd October

17:00 pm lecture, followed by a wine reception

Co-Op Lecture Theatre Minerva Building

Meredith’s key publications include Making Postmodern Mothers: Pregnant Embodiment, Baby Bumps, and Body Image (2012, Palgrave); Reframing Reproduction: Conceiving Gendered Experiences (2014, Palgrave) and Reading Lena Dunham’s Girls: Feminism, Postfeminism, Authenticity and Gendered Performance in Contemporary Television (2017, Palgrave).

 This lecture is free to attend but prior booking is essential

To get your tickets click here

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Educational Research PhD Student Video

Theresa Marriott is an Educational Research PhD student here at the University of Lincoln and she is currently writing up her final thesis, which focuses on the perceptions and identities of FE teachers. Theresa also delivers PGCE classes to teacher training students. A big thank you to Theresa for taking time out of her busy schedule to record this snapshot video for us and we wish her every success in her career.

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Lincoln Law Professor, Matthew Hall on the Sentencing of Oxford University Student, Lavinia Woodward

Macmillan Cake Sale

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Staff from the College of Social Science have managed to raise £74.26 for Macmillan Cancer Care from the cake sale held in Bridge House on Wednesday 27th September. There was a variety of delights including sponge cake, scones and cheese straws. A huge thank you to everyone who baked, bought and contributed to this fantastic cause.

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If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Lincoln Psychology Research into Gambling Addiction and the Link to Childhood Trauma

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Men with problem and pathological gambling addictions are more likely to have suffered childhood traumas including physical abuse or witnessing violence in the home, according to new research.

Psychologists examined responses in a survey of more than 3,000 men on a variety of life factors, and found that just over a quarter who had probable pathological gambling problems had witnessed violence in the home as a child. Ten per cent also reported being physically abused in childhood, and a further seven per cent said they had suffered a life-threatening injury.

Problem gamblers – those who have not yet escalated to a pathological problem, but are deemed to have a more serious addiction than non-problem gamblers – also reported higher rates of childhood trauma, with just under 23 per cent saying they had witnessed violence at home, and nine per cent experiencing physical abuse. In comparison, just eight per cent of non-problem gamblers witnessed domestic violence when they were a child, and less than four per cent had suffered abuse.

The study, led by the University of Lincoln, UK, also found that 35 per cent of pathological gamblers had suffered serious money problems as adults, 29 per cent had been convicted of a criminal offence, and almost 20 per cent had experienced relationship breakdowns. In comparison, for non-problem gamblers the figures came in at just 12, 9, and 10 per cent respectively.

The pattern of people who had previously suffered traumas in childhood or stressful events as an adult becoming pathological and problem gamblers remained even when other associated risk factors, such as substance abuse and homelessness, were accounted for. Interestingly, the more serious the gambling problem, the higher the percentage of reported childhood trauma or life stressors as an adult in all but two questions.

Researchers say the findings highlight a need for gambling treatment services to include routine screening for traumatic life events or substance abuse, so that treatments can be better tailored.

Forensic psychologist Dr Amanda Roberts, from the University of Lincoln’s School of Psychology, led the study. She said: “The links between gambling problems, trauma and life stressors have been known to exist for some time, but understanding the extent of these relationships will help early intervention and better treatment.

“We have found that among men in the United Kingdom, disordered gambling remains uniquely associated with trauma and life stressors in childhood and adulthood after adjusting for alcohol and drug dependence.

“Probable pathological gamblers and problem gamblers reported injuries, marital difficulties, homelessness, money problems and criminality more often than non/non-problem gamblers.  Taken as a whole, this suggests that disordered gambling does not occur on its own, but that it is perhaps symptomatic of other social, behavioural and psychological problems of some individuals.

“General experiences of stressful life events, such as job loss or homelessness in adulthood are not usually characterised by the same extreme psychological responses; this distinction is important, since associations with traumatic events might indicate increased vulnerability to developing gambling problems, while associations with other types of stressful life event, such as job loss, might indicate consequential harms associated with gambling.¡

The results build on Dr Roberts previous study which found that men who gamble are more likely to act violently towards others, with the most addicted gamblers the most prone to serious violence.

The new findings have been published in the journal Addictive Behaviours.

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Criminology Graduand Video

Katy Brookfield has just completed her final year studying Criminology at the University of Lincoln and she will be graduating this September. She has secured a position with the Student Wellbeing Centre here at the University as a Project Assistant and following this she will be returning to complete her Masters. We wish Katy the very best for the future and we hope to catch up with her again to find out how her post-graduate studies are going

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Criminology Graduate Case Study

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Background

In June 2015, I graduated from the University of Lincoln with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Criminology with First Class Honours. Some of the modules I studied included Psychology and Crime, Criminal Justice and Criminology in the Professions. These modules in particular stood out for me and helped me to realise that I wanted to pursue a career in either the Prison Service or the Probation Service. Alongside my studies, I decided that I wanted to engage in volunteering opportunities and work experience which would help put some of the theory I was learning into practice. I applied to be a Youth Offender Mentor with Lincolnshire Action Trust and was successful in my application. Lincolnshire Action Trust provided me with full training and paired me with a young offender who required guidance and support from a mentor. The role required me to act as a pro-social model for the young person and communicate with other agencies such as Youth Offending Teams. I also took part in the Employer Mentoring Scheme which was offered by the University which was an invaluable experience. I was mentored by a senior manager of Lincolnshire Probation trust and shadowed many key aspects of their work. This allowed me to gain work experience in the Prison Service, the Crown Court and with Probation officers. Around 4 months prior to finishing my degree I decided to start searching and applying to jobs that took my interest. It was a very stressful time to start applying for jobs as I was in the middle of my dissertation but I felt it could give me an advantage by applying early. I applied for three jobs, all quite different; admin role in the courts, a Restorative Justice Facilitator and Offender Supervisor. I was offered an interview for two out of the three jobs I applied for and in April 2015 I was fortunate enough to be offered the job of Offender Supervisor for the Prison Service. I started this role in July 2015 and almost two years later I am still thoroughly enjoying my work!

Employment Experience

As an Offender Supervisor working for the Prison Service, my key role is to support, coach and motivate offenders through their sentence. On average I work with a caseload of between 60 and 70 offenders who are a mixture of high risk, low risk and life sentenced prisoners. I am required to make regular assessments on offenders in regards to factors such as their level of risk to themselves and others, their criminogenic needs and their physical and mental wellbeing. I work closely with the Probation Service and help devise sentence plan targets for offenders to address their needs and risks. Examples of this could be, completing an offending behaviour programme or addressing drug and alcohol problems. I am responsible to making referrals to other departments such as psychology, mental health and substance misuse and liaise closely with them on a daily basis. I am also required to write reports for re-catergorisation of offenders and for the parole process. I represent offenders at oral hearings and make recommendations for potential release.

Lincoln Award

The Lincoln Award helped me to develop key skills such as CV writing, interview techniques and how to complete application forms. The Lincoln Award also offered me the opportunity to complete a Mental Health First Aid course which I could add to my CV and talk about in my interviews. To pass the award I was required to complete a mock interview which gave me excellent practice for upcoming real interviews and provided me with constructive feedback and advice going forward.

Best Career Advice

My best advice would be to try and gain some volunteering or work experience whilst at University. Although it can be difficult finding something that’s right for you and doesn’t affect your studies the benefits it offers can make a huge difference! I really noticed in my interviews that although my degree was important the key factor was what practical experience I had and what real life situations I had dealt with. Be confident when you are applying for jobs and in your interviews. Do you research so you are fully prepared for any questions they may ask you, show enthusiasm and don’t be afraid to apply for things which may be out your comfort zone!

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Suffrage Science Award for Lincoln Psychology Professor

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A psychology professor whose research on childhood development has helped to teach children safe behaviour with dogs has been recognised for her work with a Suffrage Women in Science Award.

Professor Kerstin Meints from the University of Lincoln’s School of Psychology specialises in the study of infant and child development and human-animal interaction. Her interdisciplinary work has seen the creation of language assessment tools as well as educational tools. The latter are designed to help children and parents behave safely with dogs and to recognise when a dog might be distressed, which can in turn lead to a reduction in dog bite incidents.

She has now been presented with the MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences (MRC LMS) Suffrage Women in Science Award which celebrates women in science for their scientific achievement, their ability to inspire others, and for encouraging women to enter scientific subjects and to stay in those fields.

The award itself is represented through a piece of specially-designed jewellery, a brooch which symbolises the Suffrage movement. The brooch comes in a box with ribbons depicting the three colours of the suffrage movement: green, white and purple. In the UK, those colours were worn by the Women’s Social and Political Union, led by Emmeline Pankhurst.

Professor Meints, who is the director of the Lincoln Infant and Child Development Lab, will keep the jewellery for the next two years before choosing her own nominee to pass it on to. The aim is to create a network of connected female scientists around the world who help to inspire others to enter science, and to stay.

Professor Meints said: “I feel very honoured to receive this award. I will do my very best to inspire, encourage and mentor women in science and to help them to speak up, be visible and reach their goals.

“For the next two years, and beyond, I will dedicate time to supporting colleagues and students through mentoring. I believe that encouragement and a belief that they can achieve what they aim for is vital to succeed.

“Handing on the Suffrage Science jewellery is a vote of confidence by one female scientist for another, and I look forward to nominating the next awardee in two years’ time.”

Professor Meints was one of twelve scientists to receive an award. They were presented on International Women’s Day 2017, to recognise their scientific achievements and ability to inspire others.

She was nominated by previous winner Professor Susan Condor, a social psychologist at Loughborough University whose work addresses identity and prejudice in England. Professor Condor said: “Professor Kerstin Meints’ BabyLab at Lincoln is pioneering innovative work which brings together research on infant and toddler communicative development with knowledge of animal behaviour. Her research on how young children misinterpret dogs’ facial expressions has led to the development of successful educational tools for dog bite prevention.”

The ceremony was hosted by science communicator Dr Kat Arney and took place at the Royal Society in London. It included a discussion which explored boundaries in science, be those by gender, by nationality or by scientific discipline, with three panellists.

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Professor Matthew Hall Addresses at Victims of Crime Symposium

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Last week, Professor Matthew Hall of Lincoln Law School delivered a closing plenary address at Northumbria University to the annual Symposium of the British Society of Criminology’s Specialist Victims Network. In his talk, Prof. Hall discussed the future directions of victimology and how those working within this field might inform policy making in the context of recent political upheavals around the world: including Brexit and a general shift towards more nationalistic thinking. In particular, Prof. Hall challenged the audience – made up of leading thinkers in the study of victimisation as well as representatives of the victim support community and a number of police and crime commissioners – to think more broadly about the group we label as ‘victims’, reflecting more culturally-informed (rather than a legally informed) notions of ‘victimisation’, ‘suffering’ and ‘trauma’. Drawing on examples including the 96 victims who died as a result of the Hillsborough Football Stadium Disaster of 1989, the Ched Evans rape trials and the recent attention paid to historical child sexual abuse, Matthew argued that previous cultural and legal narratives about who ‘counts’ as a victim of crime is changing and that official pronouncements to this end are not as readily accepted. This has significant implications for those tasked with supporting victims both now and in the future. Prof. Hall also emphasised the importance of speaking to victims directly in order to learn more about their needs and to tailor support mechanisms appropriately.

Professor Hall said “This has been a wonderful day of debate and discussion, emphasising how far we have come in supporting victims whilst also exposing the work that is still needed to truly do right by victims of all kinds of crime, and indeed of wider social harms”.

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk