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Lincoln Psychology Introduce New Computer Game For Children With Vision Loss

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Researchers from the University of Lincoln have teamed up with the WESC Foundation to create a new browser-based game called Eyelander, which aims to help children and young people with vision-loss to lead more independent lives.

The game was specifically designed for people with visual field loss caused by Cerebral Visual Impairment (CVI) – which is usually the result of a brain injury – and it prompts the player to use their vision more efficiently. The game requires players to move their eyes quickly around the screen to find matching shapes and colours at different positions and it is punctuated with encouraging words to motivate the player.

When played regularly the game can improve people’s performance of everyday tasks such as navigating through a crowded space or reaching for items in a supermarket.

If you are interested in trying Eyelander for free, go to their website to register and play https://www.eyelander.co.uk

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

College of Social Science Research Showcase 2018

We’re happy to present a Flickr gallery of photos from this year’s College Research Showcase that took place in the Stephen Langton building on 6th June.

The variety and quality of the research currently being undertaken by academics across all the schools in the College of Social Science demonstrates not only the innovative thinking taking place but also its wider impact in local, national and international circles.

Videos of the speakers will be available soon but in the meantime please enjoy this slideshow.

Lincoln Psychology’s Dr Amanda Roberts on the new regulations for fixed-odds betting terminals

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It was announced this morning that The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport has agreed to cut the maximum permitted stake on controversial fixed-odds betting terminals (FOBTs) from £100 to £2. Lincoln School of Psychology’s Dr Amanda Roberts has done extensive research into gambling and it’s effects and she was pleased with the news, although warns that other forms of gambling can also be problematic and should not be ignored.

“I am in agreement with the proposed changes:
 
We (myself and Stephen Sharman) were part of the DCMS consultation on FOBT’s.  Working in partnership with one of the UK’s leading gambling treatment providers (the Gordon Moody Association) allowed us to quantify the variation in disordered gamblers behaviour patterns over the last 10 years. 
 
The key findings from this work were that the forms of gambling identified as problematic by those entering treatment has changed over time, driven primarily by increases in those identifying FOBTs and other sports gambling as problem forms. This data did not directly inform the consultation on the potential impact on gambler behaviour or gambling related harm that a significant stake reduction would have, however we provided empirical support for the notion that FOBTs are the most commonly identified problem form amongst treatment seeking gamblers. Furthermore, our data highlighted that since they were introduced to the UK gambling environment, the proportion of treatment seeking gamblers identifying FOBTs as a problem form has increased more rapidly than any other form of gambling. However, we also noted that sports gambling, and the use of the internet to access all forms of gambling are also increasing, and should not be neglected in favour of focussing specifically on FOBTs.”

You can find out more about Dr Robert’s research here

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk
 

Lincoln’s Blue Dog Project Wins Award at PEARL Conference

The Public Engagement for All with Research at Lincoln (PEARL) Project is funded by RCUK and it recognises research that actively engages with the public. This year’s PEARL Conference featured speakers and presenters from across the University’s academic Colleges, detailing how people from the local community and professional practice can get involved in developing academic research ideas, participating in studies as subjects or researchers, and sharing or acting upon research findings.

Child psychologists whose work aims to help reduce the risks of dog bites in families with young children were among the award winners including the international group of researchers behind the Blue Dog Project who received the Team Award category. The team, which is led by Professor Kerstin Meints from Lincoln’s School of Psychology, has developed an interactive educational package for teachers, parents and young children that uses a cartoon dog to teach children about safe behaviours around pet dogs.

Another win for the School of Psychology went to Dr Niko Kargas who received a Staff Award for his work to support people with autism and other ‘hidden disabilities’ in the employment market.

Congratulations to everyone involved!

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Do you want to try our new body scanner?

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Body image matters to all of us. Influenced by bio-social factors as diverse as genetics, the mass media, family and peers, and even children’s toys, the internalisation of negative body ‘ideals’ can be detrimental to health for both men and women. Perceptual body image distortion (BID) is often characterised by altered self-perceptions and has been assessed in the past using a variety of scales. However, body shape measurement scales are severely limited by poor imagery. Body shape derives from a complex interaction between three attributes: adiposity, muscle mass and muscle tone. Therefore, there is a need to develop biometrically accurate, ecologically valid images with which to measure estimates of body size and shape. To do this, researchers at the School of Psychology will combine 3D body shape scanning technology with body composition measurements to generate the required high quality, CGI stimuli. Using these images, we will shed new light on the perceptual, psychological and social dimensions of body image, in health and disease.

We are looking for men and women aged 18-45 to be scanned in a 3D scanner, which creates a 3D representation of that person and a measure of their body size and shape. For your scan, we ask men to wear shorts and women to wear shorts and a crop-top. You will then stand on a bio-impedance plate which will take a measure of your body fat and muscle content. If you are interested in taking part, please contact Sophie Mohamed at sMohamed@lincoln.ac.uk or Nadia Maalin at nMaalin@lincoln.ac.uk

Former Para-athlete Kelda Wood on Working with the Human Performance Centre

Former Para-athlete Kelda Wood visited the Human Performance Centre in preparation for her attempt to solo row the Atlantic from East to West. She will be the first solo adaptive person to ever attempt this crossing and only the 6th ever solo female. She’s linking the campaign strongly to the charity Climbing Out and aims to “Raise awareness, Raise funds and Raise hope for young people facing life changing challenges”. Franky Mulloy, Research Fellow in Biomechanics, explains the technology and support the university will be providing to help Kelda achieve her goal.

For information on the School of Sport and Exercise Science’s facilities and consultancy services visit http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/sport/ 

 

Research Seminar | Identifying Barriers Experienced by Autistic Jobseekers and Work Coaches

The unfolding autism prevalence and the high unemployment rates among autistic people have led to an increase in demand for employment support mechanisms. Although UK government legislation recommends the development of evidence-based needs-led services for autistic jobseekers, there is limited research to guide employment service provision. Thus, engaging the autistic community in the research processes to develop needs-led services and practices in a manner that is mutually beneficial and meaningful is of great importance. Unfortunately, current action research models in this area often lack social acceptability or fidelity and only offer its participants a passive recipient’s role, thereby being of limited relevance to end-users.
Using a community-based participatory research approach, this project integrates psychology and human resource management to produce evidence-based information for the development of protocols to deliver needs-led work-search review meetings with autistic jobseekers. This work will be used to inform policy development and the reformulation of current professional practices employed by Disability Advisors and Work Coaches in Jobcentres across the UK.

 

Senior Lecturer/Programme Lead Department of People and Organisation in the Lincoln International Business School, Dr John Mendy is leading the research seminar, which is titled “Identifying needs and barriers experienced by autistic jobseekers and work coaches at the Jobcentre’s work search review meetings: A community-based participatory research project”, which is taking place on 14th March 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00 in LM0103 (this is located on the ground floor of the David Chiddick Building in the Executive Development Centre)

 

This is a free event and all are welcome to attend.
 

Seminar: An Introduction to Grounded Theory

Reposted from Staff News: 

On Wednesday 28th February, Dr Julie Pattinson, Research  Assistant at the School of Health and Social Care will give a seminar entitled ‘Grounded Theory’.

This is part of the Community and Health Research Unit seminar series.

Grounded Theory is a research method used by qualitative researchers in the Social Sciences. The talk will focus on the wider idea of Grounded Theory as a methodology, its origins in sociology (Glaser & Strauss, 1967) and how it can be applied to numerous disciplines.

The seminar will take place from 10:00am-11:00am in DCB1107 (David Chiddick building). Booking is not required.

Social and Political Sciences Professor Steve McKay Featured in The Express

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Professor Steve McKay, from the School of Social and Political Sciences has contributed to a study that has recently been featured in an article about planned pregnancy and it’s impact on relationships. The research, jointly undertaken by the Marriage Foundation and the University of Lincoln, used data from 18,374 mothers in the Millennium Cohort Study and was published to mark the start of Marriage Week. The study explains that less than a fifth (18 per cent) of married parents who planned to start a family had broken up by the time their child reached 14 years old, but almost a quarter (24 per cent) of those whose baby was not a joint decision had split by the same point. Amongst cohabiting couples, the rate of breakdown was almost half (47 per cent) while fewer than two in five (38 per cent) separated if they had made a plan to have children. But the contrast over the first three years of a relationship was especially stark, according to the Marriage Foundation analysis. Only four per cent of married couples whose first pregnancy was planned split up within three years compared to more than 20 per cent of non-married parents who never made it to their third anniversary after not discussing a potential pregnancy.

Professor Steve McKay adds that “Even after controlling for mother’s age, education, ethnicity, marital status and relationship happiness nine months after their child was born, the odds of a couple splitting up before their child becomes a teenager were 28 per cent greater if they had not planned the birth.”

You can read the full article here

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Educational Research PhD Student Video

Theresa Marriott is an Educational Research PhD student here at the University of Lincoln and she is currently writing up her final thesis, which focuses on the perceptions and identities of FE teachers. Theresa also delivers PGCE classes to teacher training students. A big thank you to Theresa for taking time out of her busy schedule to record this snapshot video for us and we wish her every success in her career.

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk