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College of Social Science Research Showcase 2018

We’re happy to present a Flickr gallery of photos from this year’s College Research Showcase that took place in the Stephen Langton building on 6th June.

The variety and quality of the research currently being undertaken by academics across all the schools in the College of Social Science demonstrates not only the innovative thinking taking place but also its wider impact in local, national and international circles.

Videos of the speakers will be available soon but in the meantime please enjoy this slideshow.

Robert Goemans and Lucy Bright featured on BASW YouTube channel

Senior lecturers in the School of Health and Social Care Robert Goemans and Lucy bright are currently featured in a video talking about the Approved Mental Health Professional role on the new British Association of Social Workers YouTube channel and can be viewed below:

Do you want to try our new body scanner?

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Body image matters to all of us. Influenced by bio-social factors as diverse as genetics, the mass media, family and peers, and even children’s toys, the internalisation of negative body ‘ideals’ can be detrimental to health for both men and women. Perceptual body image distortion (BID) is often characterised by altered self-perceptions and has been assessed in the past using a variety of scales. However, body shape measurement scales are severely limited by poor imagery. Body shape derives from a complex interaction between three attributes: adiposity, muscle mass and muscle tone. Therefore, there is a need to develop biometrically accurate, ecologically valid images with which to measure estimates of body size and shape. To do this, researchers at the School of Psychology will combine 3D body shape scanning technology with body composition measurements to generate the required high quality, CGI stimuli. Using these images, we will shed new light on the perceptual, psychological and social dimensions of body image, in health and disease.

We are looking for men and women aged 18-45 to be scanned in a 3D scanner, which creates a 3D representation of that person and a measure of their body size and shape. For your scan, we ask men to wear shorts and women to wear shorts and a crop-top. You will then stand on a bio-impedance plate which will take a measure of your body fat and muscle content. If you are interested in taking part, please contact Sophie Mohamed at sMohamed@lincoln.ac.uk or Nadia Maalin at nMaalin@lincoln.ac.uk

Former Para-athlete Kelda Wood on Working with the Human Performance Centre

Former Para-athlete Kelda Wood visited the Human Performance Centre in preparation for her attempt to solo row the Atlantic from East to West. She will be the first solo adaptive person to ever attempt this crossing and only the 6th ever solo female. She’s linking the campaign strongly to the charity Climbing Out and aims to “Raise awareness, Raise funds and Raise hope for young people facing life changing challenges”. Franky Mulloy, Research Fellow in Biomechanics, explains the technology and support the university will be providing to help Kelda achieve her goal.

For information on the School of Sport and Exercise Science’s facilities and consultancy services visit http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/sport/ 

 

Seminar: An Introduction to Grounded Theory

Reposted from Staff News: 

On Wednesday 28th February, Dr Julie Pattinson, Research  Assistant at the School of Health and Social Care will give a seminar entitled ‘Grounded Theory’.

This is part of the Community and Health Research Unit seminar series.

Grounded Theory is a research method used by qualitative researchers in the Social Sciences. The talk will focus on the wider idea of Grounded Theory as a methodology, its origins in sociology (Glaser & Strauss, 1967) and how it can be applied to numerous disciplines.

The seminar will take place from 10:00am-11:00am in DCB1107 (David Chiddick building). Booking is not required.

Rob Goemans and Nigel Horner give talk on the history of Lincoln’s Asylum

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Rob Goemans (Senior Lecturer) and Nigel Horner (Head of School) from the School of Health and Social Care were invited by Stokes to give a talk on the history of the building at The Lawns that Stokes have now moved their coffee business into. The University’s Lincoln Lunatic Asylum Project, led by Rob, is carrying out research analysing the original documents seeking to understand how identity and madness was constructed and understood in Lincoln’s asylum. The Lincoln Lunatic Asylum (LLA) opened in 1820 and, in 1837, became the first asylum in the country to achieve total abolition of mechanical restraint.

The talk, which focussed on the establishment of the asylum, and the factors which influenced the abolition of mechanical restraint, proved highly popular, with attendees filling the old asylum’s ballroom to capacity, around 120 people.

The university will be working with Stokes to develop information boards and leaflets to inform visitors of the history of the building. Anyone wishing for further information about the project may contact Rob via rgoemans@lincoln.ac.uk.

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Lincoln Psychology academic published by The Conversation

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Dr Kay Ritchie, Lecturer in Cognitive Psychology, has recently had an article published by TheConversation.com, looking at the challenges faced by facial recognition technology.

The article, “The trouble with facial recognition technology (in the real world)”, which can be read HERE, was written in collaboration with Robin Kramer of the University of York and highlights both the shortcomings of current facial recognition technology as well as the general difficulties humans have in recognizing unfamiliar faces.

 “In general, passport officers are no better than university students when matching unfamiliar people – and research shows that training in this area doesn’t seem to make a difference – you’ve either got it or you haven’t.”

To read the article in full, please visit The Conversation website.

Dr Ritchie can be found on Twitter @kayritchiepsych, as well as on ReasearchGate.

[The Conversation is an independent source of news and views, sourced from the academic and research community and delivered direct to the public.]

If you have something you would like us to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Lincoln psychology representitives win prize for RAISE workshop

The RAISE (Researching, Advancing and Inspiring Student Engagement) annual two-day conference was held at Loughborough University in September 2016. There was a strong representation from staff and students from the College of Social Science, making presentations on a variety of teaching and learning research pertaining to student engagement.

Dr Rachel Bromnick, Dr Ava Horowitz and former student Megan Kemp from the School of Psychology, ran a workshop based on their SEED funded project looking at the problem of students packing away their belongings before their university lecturer has finished talking. Their research applied Conversation Analysis as a way into understanding why this behaviour occurs, what triggers it and how it might be managed.

Their lively workshop was well attended and their presentation went on to win the prize for the best presentation of the conference, as voted for by delegates. The RAISE committee congratulated the team and said that delegates were fulsome in their praise about how good the workshop was.

The college would like to extend their congratulations to Dr Rachel Bromnick, Dr Ava Horowitz and Megan Kemp on their prize winning workshop, as well as our thanks to all the Social Science staff and students who attended the conference to present their hard work.

If you have something you would like to post here, please email: collegesocialscience@lincoln.ac.uk

Second Year Student Published by The Psychologist

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Second year psychology student and blogger, Maddi Pownall has had an article published by the British Psychological Society’s publication The Psychologist.

The article titled “New voices: Slam science”, published on The Psychologist blog page, looks at the language of slam poetry and its appeal to both literary academics and psychologists with Maddi stating:

“The psychological mechanisms at play in the act of slam poetry are vast. Self-expression, emotional capacity and the pursuit of meaning in contemporary culture are all in force when enacting a slam poem.”

Maddi had previously had a letter relating to the topic of School Skirt Bans published in the August edition of the Magazine, and republished on their website. It is a fantastic achievement from one of our students for which the School of Psychology as well as the College of Social Science would like to congratulate her.

To read the article in full please visit The Psychologist website.

Maddi can be found on Twitter @maddi_pow, and on her own blog Thought Bubbles (Twitter: @1thoughbubbles). She will also have another article published in PsychTalk Magazine’s January edition, and hopefully many more to come.

College of Social Science Graduate Prize Giving

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September saw another great graduation week for the University, but as with every graduation the college also took the time to recognise the excellent efforts of those students who have gone above and beyond while studying for their degrees.

The prize giving ceremonies took place on Tuesday 6th, and Wednesday 7th September, with students from the schools of Law, Psychology, Health & Social Care, Social & Political Science, Sport & Exercise Science being honoured.

The events were well attended by staff and family and were a brilliant addition to an already exciting and busy week for the College.

We would once again like to thank the members of staff who nominated the students, and to congratulate the students themselves who received their prizes.

You can see more pictures from the events in the gallery below.

 

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